Library Notes for Political Science

Teaching resources, news, and links to keep McGill’s Political Scientists informed

Report on scholarly communication

Posted by Megan on February 17, 2010

An interesting read for anyone involved in academic publishing:

Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication: An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines, a report published by the Center for Studies in Higher Education at the University of California-Berkeley.

This enormous document reports on a study of the communication practices and preferences of academics in seven academic disciplines. Chapter 8 reports on Political Science researchers.

The key questions examined are:

  • REQUIREMENTS FOR TENURE AND PROMOTION: WHAT ARE THE QUALITIES OF A SUCCESSFUL SCHOLAR?
  • CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISSEMINATING RESEARCH: WHAT ARE YOUR CRITERIA FOR CHOOSING A MEDIUM?
  • HOW DO YOU SHARE YOUR WORK WITH OTHER SCHOLARS AND KEEP UP TO DATE IN A FIELD?
  • HOW DO YOU COLLABORATE WITH OTHER SCHOLARS? AT WHAT STAGE OF RESEARCH?
  • WHAT DO YOU NEED TO CONDUCT YOUR RESEARCH?
  • TO WHAT DEGREE DO YOU OR YOUR COLLEAGUES ENGAGE WITH THE PUBLIC? HOW? WHY OR WHY NOT?

The first page of the Political Science section summarizes the findings, noting that, in broad terms, researchers are trending toward publishing journals rather than books, sharing of information in non-traditional channels and collaboration across fields in on the rise, and new tools for managing and analyzing data are increasingly demanded.

Here is an official description of the study from the website:

“Since 2005, the Center for Studies in Higher Education (CSHE), with generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, has been conducting research to understand the needs and practices of faculty for in-progress scholarly communication (i.e., forms of communication employed as research is being executed) as well as archival publication. The complete results of our work can be found at the Future of Scholarly Communication?s project website. This report brings together the responses of 160 interviewees across 45, mostly elite, research institutions to closely examine scholarly needs and values in seven selected academic fields: archaeology, astrophysics, biology, economics, history, music, and political science.”

Advertisements

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: