Library Notes for Political Science

Teaching resources, news, and links to keep McGill’s Political Scientists informed

Open Access Week

Posted by Megan on October 16, 2009

Open Access Week

October 19-23, 2009 has been designated Open Access Week, with its goal “to broaden awareness and understanding of Open Access.”

The McGill Library has created a page with more information about open access, selections of which are reproduced here.

What is open access?

“Open Access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.” –Peter Suber

Why should I care?

Open access

  • gives your work more exposure by making it openly available on the internet and found via most search engines (like Google)
  • provides universal access to your work (it is not hidden behind subscription barriers)
  • meets the requirements of many funding agencies which stipulate that research be made publicly available (eScholarship@McGill meets this requirement)

Your rights as an author

  • the author holds copyright of a work unless they transfer it to someone else in a signed agreement
  • assigning copyright to someone else matters, as they can do anything with your work, and can prevent you from using it in course work and reusing it in subsequent work
  • there are tools available where you can transfer copyright while holding back key rights—publishing agreements are negotiable

SPARC Canadian Author’s Addendum

The SPARC Canadian Author’s Addendum is a legal instrument that helps you modify the publisher’s agreement and keep key rights to your article.

Authors

  • retain your rights
  • reuse your work without restrictions
  • receive proper attribution for your work
  • make your work openly available through an open access repository

Publishers

  • have a non-exclusive right to publish and distribute your work, and receive financial return
  • are cited as journal of first publication
  • able to use the work in future formats, including collections

For more information visit the Canadian Association of Research Libraries.

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